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March 14, 2013
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News about cardiovascular disease prevention and management

  Heart Health News 
  • Targeting obesity in young adults may prevent heart problems
    People who are overweight, especially as young adults, are at risk of developing an enlarged heart, raising their chances of cardiovascular disease, according to a U.K. study that was slated for presentation at the American College of Cardiology meeting. "Targeting obesity at a young age is exceptionally valuable to improving cardiovascular health and this study reaffirms this," said Dr. Eugenia Gianos of New York University Langone Medical Center. HealthDay News (3/7) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Screening using BNP may prevent heart failure, study says
    Screening patients at risk for heart failure but without symptoms, and then beginning treatment based on B-type natriuretic peptide levels, reduced the risk of hospitalization for heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, according to a study from University Hospital in Dublin presented at the American College of Cardiology meeting. Researcher Dr. Kenneth McDonald said the study shows that BNP screening could have "a significant impact on the development of new-onset heart failure." MedPage Today (free registration) (3/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Smoking cessation reduces heart risk despite weight gain
    Quitting smoking significantly lowers the likelihood of heart attack or stroke even if it leads to gaining an average of six to eight pounds, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The few additional pounds gained after kicking the habit had no clear impact on cardiovascular health, researchers said. Reuters (3/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Emerging Trends 
  • People with, without diabetes lower blood pressure using telehealth
    Using telehealth tools to monitor and report blood pressure and other medical information was associated with improvements in blood pressure and provided support for lifestyle changes, according to a study that was to be presented at the American College of Cardiology conference. Participants without diabetes saw their blood pressure improve by 58.2%, while participants with diabetes reduced their blood pressure by 45.2%. The study was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Modern Healthcare (subscription required) (3/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Heart failure risk seen among black breast cancer survivors
    U.S. researchers looked at more than 26,000 breast cancer survivors and found that black women had the highest rate of heart failure compared with others. While the risk of heart failure was greater for black women than white women in the study, the risk of death was the same after the disease developed. The study was presented at the American College of Cardiology meeting. DoctorsLounge.com/HealthDay News (3/7) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Nursing in the News 
  • Nurses can treat sleep apnea, study says
    Sleep apnea patients treated by primary care nurses and doctors with appropriate training had outcomes comparable to those treated by specialists, researchers in Australia reported in JAMA. Sleep apnea is common in middle-age adults who are overweight and has been linked to cardiovascular disease. Reuters (3/12), HealthDay News (3/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  • What does the future hold for nursing in the U.S.?
    An increasing emphasis on the postgraduate education of nurses is a key not only to improving patient outcomes but also to meeting the demand for nursing school faculty, says Carol Brewer, a professor at the University at Buffalo's nursing school. It's important for the health system to support registered nurses' full scope of practice, she says. "Laws designed to protect turf that do not improve quality are not useful. The real issue is money -- loss of income for physicians who can bill for collaborating with nurse practitioners," she says. The Buffalo News (N.Y.) (3/9) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  PCNA Update 
  • Win $5,000 to fund your organization's wellness program
    PCNA is challenging hospitals and organizations to spread awareness about heart disease prevention by hosting a Prevention Challenge for your employees or members. Participating organizations have the option to submit your Prevention Challenge to PCNA for a chance to win a $5,000 award to fund your healthy lifestyle or wellness program. Learn more. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Lead Quote 
People may say I can't sing, but no one can ever say I didn't sing."
--Florence Foster Jenkins,
American amateur operatic soprano


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