Reading this on a mobile device? Try our optimized mobile version here: http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/dYjhCfbwocePwYupxGwi

October 31, 2012
CONNECT WITH SMARTBRIEFLinkedInFacebookTwitter
 
Share|Sign up|Archive|Advertise
Healthy Start 
  • Teaching weight-maintenance skills may help diets succeed
    Stanford University researchers said people who worked on weight-loss maintenance skills before they started a diet were more likely to sustain their weight loss for one year. The study on the website of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology focused on "stability first" skills such as learning to find low-fat and low-calorie foods, daily weighing and experimenting with losing weight before vacations and holidays. Medscape (free registration) (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Pat Croce Reveals His Insights for Acting on Your Passion
If you're ready to "get your butt off the couch and get into the game of life," it's time to get inspired by this successful entrepreneur and leadership expert. Read the featured article.

Dietary Health 
 
  • "Wheat Belly" diet takes wheat products off the menu
    Some nutrition experts recommend dieters stop eating wheat, based on arguments in the book "Wheat Belly" that blood glucose reactions to wheat products lead to weight gain. Dietitian Linda Enright says it isn't necessary to make such drastic changes, and recommends focusing on whole grains along with fruits, vegetables and meats, while cutting back on pre-packaged and processed foods. KMSP-TV (Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.) (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
eBook: Why It's Time to Evaluate Your Timekeeping System
Download the free eBook to learn why yesterday's timekeeping tools aren't cut out for today's rapidly evolving compliance mandates. Learn how modern, cloud-based solutions can help you reduce the risk of noncompliance, gain unprecedented visibility, and manage in the moment. Don't let outdated workforce management tools drag you down. Click here to learn more.

Science & Research 
  • Study looks at obesity risk factors among students
    A study presented at the American Public Health Association annual meeting revealed drinking soda and having a sedentary lifestyle increase the risk of obesity among students, but eating more meals per day and playing school sports lower the risk. Researchers, who were evaluating a school-based program, also found children at poorer schools were more likely to be overweight and gain more weight, compared with students at schools with a higher socioeconomic status. HealthDay News (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
  • Fish consumption may slightly reduce odds of stroke
    Intake of at least two servings of fish per week was linked to a 6% to 12% decline in the risk of suffering a stroke, according to a meta-analysis published in the journal BMJ. However, U.K. researchers found that omega-3 supplementation did not affect the risk of cerebrovascular events. MedPage Today (free registration) (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
  • Obesity researchers focus on sense of smell
    Scientists who study obesity are turning their attention to olfactory bulbs, which relay smell information and are dense with insulin receptors. Research indicates that mice bred to have a better sense of smell are resistant to obesity, but they lose that resistance if olfactory bulbs are removed. The Wall Street Journal (10/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Fitness 
  • People who exercise before breakfast burn more fat
    Men who exercised before eating breakfast burned 33% more fat compared with those who exercised after breakfast, according to a study in the British Journal of Nutrition. Exercising on an empty stomach was also associated with greater reductions in artery-clogging blood fats, researchers noted. Yahoo/Asian News International (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Institutional Foodservice 
  • RD leads nutrition makeover at VA hospital in Miss.
    Registered dietitian Tricia Mathias led a program to replace tray-line food delivery at a Veterans Affairs hospital in Jackson, Miss., with a personalized system using carts with ovens and refrigerated sections. The change has led to increases in salad and vegetable consumption and less wasted food because veterans choose what they want to eat. Today's Dietitian (10/2012) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Recipe of the Day 
  • Festive Halloween cocktails
    Witches' Brew? Zombie Cocktail? Severed Hand Sangria? Take your pick. Cooking Channel LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Food For Thought 
Serving fresh meals is not as easy as changing the food that is on the plate."
--Zenobia Barlow, executive director of the Center for Ecoliteracy, as quoted by The Examiner
LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story

 
Click here to view more job listings.


SmartBrief delivers need-to-know news in over 100 targeted email newsletters to over 3 million readers. All our industry briefings are FREE and open to everyone—sign up today!
Accounting
Advertising
Automotive
Aviation & Aerospace
Biotechnology
Business
Chemicals
Construction & Real Estate
Consumer Packaged Goods
Distribution
Education
Energy
Finance
Food Service
Health Care
Insurance
Legal
Manufacturing
Media & Entertainment
Nonprofit
Retail
Technology
Telecommunications
Travel & Hospitality
 

Subscriber Tools
SIGNUP SEND FEEDBACK E-MAIL THIS BRIEF
Today's Brief - Permalink | Print friendly format | Web version | Privacy policy

Advertise
Account Director:  Hillary Batchelder 202-407-7803
Job Board:  Jackie Basso (202) 407-7871
 
SmartBrief Community:
 
 
Recent SmartBrief for Nutritionists Issues:   Lead Editor:  Kathryn Doherty
     
Mailing Address:
SmartBrief, Inc.®, 555 11th ST NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20004
 
 
© 1999-2012 SmartBrief, Inc.® Legal Information