Reading this on a mobile device? Try our optimized mobile version here: http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/ekewCfbwocfbmezRnTBW

  ADVERTISEMENT  
February 12, 2013
Sign upForwardArchiveAdvertise
Right Care. Right Now.

  Critical Care Update 
 
  • Study: Rapidly lowering BP is safe in intracerebral hemorrhage
    Canadian researchers said study data show rapidly lowering blood pressure in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage is safe and does not affect blood flow around the hematoma. The study, reported in the journal Stroke and presented at the International Stroke Conference, may ease concerns that aggressive reductions in blood pressure will affect cerebral blood flow, according to Dr. Steven Greenberg of the Massachusetts General Hospital Stroke Research Center. MedPage Today (free registration) (2/9) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  ADVERTISEMENT  
9 Tips to Bring Order to Hospital Communications Chaos
With the amount of information today's healthcare technology generates, communications have become intricate webs of guesswork, unknown mobile devices, confusing schedules, and just too many systems going beep. In this paper you'll find nine tips to cope with this chaos and give it the order your patients and staff so desperately need. Read white paper.

  Medicine in the News 
 
  • Each part of advanced care planning has benefits, study finds
    A study of Medicare beneficiaries found benefits to each aspect of advanced care planning, and patients who helped plan their care had reduced odds of dying in a hospital and a greater chance of receiving hospice care, according to a report in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, said the study suggests using just one element, such as an advance directive, may not provide the same benefits as a multimodel advance care plan. MedWire News (U.K.) (2/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Group releases recommendations for better post-discharge care
    The American Medical Association has released five patient safety principles for transitioning patients from inpatient to outpatient care. "Patients leaving the hospital too often return to ambulatory care settings that are not well connected to the hospital team and this can result in inefficient, confusing and sometimes unsafe conditions," the report's authors wrote. Evaluating patient health, setting goals, supporting self-management and managing medications were among the responsibilities outlined in the report. HealthLeaders Media (2/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Are you sharing files the wrong way?
Read this free infographic to see the negative side of not caring how your company sends files. Learn how to share better with others so that you can easily:
• Know file-size restrictions for email and the limitations of FTP.
• Avoid freemium services that put you at risk for data breaches.
• Discover the best way to share data and store it securely in one place.
Download the free infographic now.
Advertisement

  Trends and Technology 
 
  • Stem cells could lead to better skin grafts, Canadian researchers say
    University of Calgary researchers are experimenting with stem cells to create skin grafts that perform more like natural skin. Trauma patients, cancer patients and burn survivors would benefit from better split-thickness skin grafts, researchers said. The researchers aim to create skin grafts that promote healing and allow the growth of follicles. CBC.ca (Canada) (2/7) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
[Free eBook] Hacking Value Delivery: The CIO and the Age of the Customer
CIOs today have a wealth of opportunity available to them in the Age of the Customer, and they play an even more paramount role in their organization as enterprises become increasingly digital and customer-centric. Unfortunately, CIOs are also up against outdated notions of their role - and limited budgets. As a result, too few CIOs have fully embraced the opportunity to drive their businesses into the customer age. Learn how to make the cultural change to a customer-first approach with this free eBook. Get it now.
Advertisement

  Editor's Note 
  • When do you most often read Critical Care SmartBrief?
At the end of the day or in the evening.
Lunchtime.
When I can find time between patient visits.
First thing in the morning.
I typically catch up on this reading over the weekend.

  SmartQuote 
We spend our time searching for security and hate it when we get it."
--John Steinbeck,
American author


LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

 
 
Subscriber Tools
     
Print friendly format | Web version | Search past news | Archive | Privacy policy

Advertise
Sales Account Director:  Aaron Kern (202) 407-7866
 
Read more at SmartBrief.com
A powerful website for SmartBrief readers including:
 
 
 Recent Critical Care SmartBrief Issues:   Lead Editor:  Kathryn Doherty
     
Mailing Address:
SmartBrief, Inc.®, 555 11th ST NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20004
 
 
© 1999-2013 SmartBrief, Inc.® Legal Information