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December 31, 2012
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Collaborating to advance literacy learning

  Transforming Literacy Learning 
 
  • School's reading teacher uses flexible approach
    Reading teacher Amber Mortenson helps educators at Prairie Trail Elementary School in Ankeny, Iowa, improve student reading by collaborating with classroom teachers, tutoring students and providing other teachers with informal professional development. Teachers also perform frequent assessments and tailor instruction and academic goals for each student. "I think we've gotten smarter about it," said Mortenson, whose position is known as a literacy leader. "The more we learn, the better we get at instructing kids. We've put a lot of time into teachers learning how to best use data." The Des Moines Register (Iowa) (12/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

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  Literacy Everywhere 
  • Students learn, play in 2 languages at Wash. school
    A school in Washington state has launched a new two-way language immersion program, in which preschool and kindergarten students speak Spanish three days each week. Two days a week, students perform their daily routines in English. Officials said the program was initiated in part to reach out to Hispanic students. Officials say they hope eventually to expand the program to older students. The News Tribune (Tacoma, Wash.) (12/27) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Education Policy 
  • Common core advocates rebut idea that nonfiction replaces literature
    Common Core State Standards supporters are beginning to counter the idea that the new standards will push literature out of the classroom in favor of nonfiction texts, education reporter Catherine Gewertz writes in this blog post. "Contrary to reports, classic literature will not be lost with the implementation of the new standards," reads an e-mail blast from Jeb Bush's Foundation for Excellence in Education. Education Week/Curriculum Matters blog (12/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Leadership and Capacity Building 
  • Leading in schools by developing new leaders
    There are three things that good school leaders can do to help develop other leaders, writes Joe Mazza, lead learner at Knapp Elementary School in suburban Philadelphia. He suggests in this blog post that they invest in a healthy school culture, which fosters trust and respect among all teachers. He also recommends that leaders invest in relationships and an "outside the box" lens. SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Education (12/27) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  Professional Learning 
  • Creating school environments that are sensitive to trauma
    The recent tragedy in Newtown, Conn., demonstrates the need for educators to help develop "trauma-sensitive schools," according to the blog post written by Eric Rossen, a nationally certified school psychologist and licensed psychologist in Maryland. At "trauma-sensitive schools," educators are responsive "to the potential impact of trauma and adverse experiences on students' lives" and help ensure that all students "feel safe, connected, and supported," writes Rossen, co-editor of "Supporting and Educating Traumatized Students: A Guide for School-Based Professionals." Oxford University Press/OUP Blog (12/21) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  NCLE Spotlight 
  • Searching for good data about instructional efficacy
    In this post, KaiLonnie Dunsmore writes, "One of the most important areas of growth for me professionally was in developing expertise both in learning how to use standardized data effectively as a tool (which means understanding how and why it is limited in scope and what kinds of uses and interpretations are valid) and in developing multiple ways to assess student learning and thinking in the classroom so that I knew how to better plan instruction for tomorrow and next week." Read on. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • On teaching content: Building a schoolwide culture
    How can we make sure that reading, writing, speaking, and listening are part of the instructional routines in every subject area? In this clip, teachers across subject areas discuss the ways in which literacy instructional routines develop students' understanding about the content. They share successful approaches for engaging students with vocabulary, writing, and building background such that learning occurs. Read on. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Learn more about NCLE ->About NCLE  |  Literacy in Learning Exchange
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  SmartQuote 
Never tell your resolution beforehand, or it's twice as onerous a duty."
--John Selden,
English jurist and scholar


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