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October 31, 2012
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News covering the digital entertainment industry

  Entertainment News 
  • Analysis: Lucasfilm buy means digital-media benefits for Disney
    Disney will pay about $4 billion to acquire Lucasfilm, including the entire "Star Wars" franchise, in a deal that is expected to increase the studio's digital-media empire. "It is a sustainable source of branded, high-quality creative content with tremendous global appeal that will benefit all of Disney's business units and is incredibly well suited for new business models, including digital platforms," CEO Bob Iger said. VentureBeat (10/31), USA Today (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Domino's will try its hand at delivering video in U.K.
    Domino's Pizza is broadening its delivery options to include video under a deal with Lionsgate U.K. to stream movies. Under the agreement, U.K.-based customers who order a pizza from the Domino's website will be given access to Domino's Pizza Box Office, where they can pay to stream Lionsgate movies, including new releases such as "The Hunger Games." Variety (subscription required) (10/30), The Hollywood Reporter (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  • Other News
  Monetizing Content 
  • Startup aims to expand metered-pay-wall reach
    Tinypass, a provider of website-monetization solutions for small publishers, is adding a metered-pay-wall option that will allow clients to charge its subscribers by the number of articles read or for access over a specified time. The company, which has relationships with more than 250 publishers, will offer client- and a server-side metering options and will give publishers flexibility on whom they wish to provide with free access. (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Integrated Marketing 
  • Jivox addresses cross-platform ad-campaign issues
    Jivox has created a cross-platform tool that would help a publisher run the same ad on devices with different screen sizes without reformatting. CEO Diaz Nesamoney says that by eliminating "technology assimilation issues," advertisers can achieve a higher return on investment and gain higher engagement. Customers of the startup include Bloomberg, Federated Media, Fox News, GroupM, OMD and Starcom. Adweek (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Advertisers take up the mobile battle cry
    Inventiveness is the key for advertisers in the developing mobile space, where the small screen demands that marketers find new ways to engage people who are on the go. The potential for reaching consumers at opportune moments is high, but the challenges are great as well, given imperfect ways of tracking results and consumer reluctance to make mobile purchases. The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (10/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  eBooks, Tablets and More 
  • IPhone 5 helps Apple battle Android in U.S., U.K.
    Apple's iPhone 5 has helped the company regain market share from Android devices in the U.K. and U.S. But on the European continent, Android continues to dominate and win market share. Apple's iOS commands 35.7% of the U.S. market, compared with 57.5% for Android, though Android has a smaller share than a year ago. TechCrunch (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Report questions U.K.'s claims about superfast broadband
    A report has put a damper on claims that a superfast broadband network in the U.K. will be a boon to the economy and lead to a sustained increase in jobs. The study, from the Economist Intelligence Unit, says that while a $1.6 billion plan to boost broadband speeds threefold by 2015 will improve national competitiveness, many of the benefits promised by the government are believed to be exaggerated. The Wall Street Journal/Tech Europe blog (10/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Entertainment Matters at CES 
  • Consumer electronics industry announces Ultra High-Definition
    The next generation of so-called "4K" high-definition display technology for the home -- giant-screen TVs with more than 8 million pixels of resolution, four times the resolution of today's high-definition televisions -- will be called "Ultra High-Definition" or "Ultra HD," connoting its superiority over conventional HDTV. CEA's Board of Industry Leaders unanimously voted this week to endorse the consensus opinion of CEA's "4K" Working Group recommending the term "Ultra High-Definition" and related performance attributes. The Working Group, now known as the CEA Ultra HD Working Group, brings a wide array of stakeholders together to discuss how best to define and educate consumers about this new technology. The industry's new designation for Ultra HD products was the result of extensive consumer research conducted by CEA's market research group. "Ultra HD" consistently rated highest in terms of helping consumers understand the technology and in communicating the technology's superior viewing experience. For more information, view full release. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

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We pride ourselves on offering a vast choice when it comes to pizza and the same is true of Domino's Pizza Box Office -- whether you're into action, horror or rom-coms, there's something for every pizza-eating occasion."
--Simon Wallis of Domino's Pizza, as quoted by Variety

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