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September 11, 2012
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Healthy Start 
  • Cities use health-reform money to push healthy behaviors
    Oklahoma City is among the communities using money from a $10 billion preventive health fund created by the Affordable Care Act to pay for programs that teach people about the importance of a healthy diet and exercise and help them get into disease-prevention programs. Public-health officials say these programs could create a cultural shift, while critics say they will have only a small effect on influencing behaviors unless they are backed by policies such as taxes on soda or restrictions on marketing to children. The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (9/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Get Creative: 10 Ways to Think Outside the Box
No matter your business, smart solutions come from out-of-the-box thinking. We all know creativity is king, but are you doing all you can to inspire and encourage creativity in your staff? Read the article and learn 10 ways to inspire creativity at your office.

Dietary Health 
  • Healthy diet is important for back-to-school success, experts say
    Families should include a healthy diet at home as a tool to help their children find success in the classroom, experts say. Children's National Medical Center pediatric dietitian Megan Barna says a child's dietary habits can affect their energy level, mood and academic performance. Johns Hopkins neurologist Majid Fotuhi suggests starting with a Mediterranean-style diet for brain health and ensuring that children get plenty of vitamins B, C, E and D. The Washington Post (9/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
  • After-school snacks should pack a nutritional punch, RDs say
    The best after-school snacks for children include fresh fruits and vegetables and provide nutrients, vitamins and fiber, say registered dietitians from PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver, Wash. RD Sarah Winans of the Camas School District says she encourages parents to make sure their children are not "mindlessly eating in front of the TV or computer" because that can lead to overeating. The Columbian (Vancouver, Wash.) (9/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story

Science & Research 
  • Drinking mate tea may boost glycemic, lipid profiles in diabetes
    Consumption of yerba mate tea was associated with lower fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin and bad-cholesterol levels in participants with type 2 diabetes, researchers reported in the Journal of American College of Nutrition. Consumption of mate tea, combined with nutritional counseling, helped improve fat, cholesterol and triglyceride levels in patients with prediabetes. FoodConsumer.org (9/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Fitness 
Institutional Foodservice 
  • School district, hospital teach "Go, Slow, Whoa" to students
    Montana's Missoula County Public Schools and St. Patrick Hospital are teaching students about good nutrition and using the "Go, Slow, Whoa" program to make menu changes and emphasize healthy food choices. School officials say the next challenge is educating parents that the district is offering student favorites, such as corn dogs and nachos, that are made from healthier ingredients. Missoulian (Missoula, Mont.) (9/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
  • Wisconsin schools increase focus on health, wellness
    Schools in Wisconsin are working to align their meals with federal nutrition standards, and officials say the changes include increasing students' access to fruits and vegetables and lowering their sodium intake. One district is offering salad stations and the Thrive health and fitness program, which includes vegetable gardens, family wellness nights and staff fitness classes. Green Bay Press-Gazette (Wis.) (9/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Recipe of the Day 
  • Honey glazed salmon
    This broiled salmon dish comes together in just 10 minutes -- perfect for a busy weeknight. The Well-Fed Heart LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Food For Thought 
While the short-term consequences of food consumption on the brain are well appreciated, many people don't realize that nutrition has a huge impact on brain function over years and over decades."
--Neurologist Majid Fotuhi, as quoted by The Washington Post
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