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January 29, 2013
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  Critical Care Update 
  • Study: Aggressive approach decreased MRSA cases in N.C. hospital
    The implementation of a pre-emptive swab of all admitted patients, also called a search-and-destroy approach to infections, reduced methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia cases at the Vidant Medical Center in Greenville, N.C., by 58%. The approach also led to a 79% reduction in cases of MRSA central line-associated bloodstream infections, according to findings presented at the Society of Critical Care Medicine annual meeting. The findings may encourage hospitals to consider more aggressive treatments for MRSA, an expert said. Medscape (free registration) (1/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Transfusions tied to immune system suppression in children
    Critically injured children who received blood transfusions had lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, an indication the immune system is being repressed, according to a study presented at the SCCM annual meeting. Their immune systems reverted to normal functioning sooner with the use of blood that was less than two weeks old. "Our findings provide evidence that storage age could play a role in modulating immune function in critically injured children, and we feel this is worthy of future studies," researcher Dr. Ryan Nofziger said. MedPage Today (free registration) (1/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Manual resuscitation bags harbor bacteria, study shows
    Manual resuscitation bags marked as clean were found to harbor bacteria, resulting in a policy change at the University of Tennessee Medical Center requiring replacement by day four rather than waiting until the bags were visibly soiled, according to researchers who reported the findings at SCCM's annual meeting. Dr. Robert Hyzy, critical care director at the University of Michigan Health System, said the bigger issue is whether the bacterial cultures have resulted in an increase in infection rates. Medscape (free registration) (1/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Medicine in the News 
  • Nearly half of hospital physicians are overworked, study finds
    Four in 10 U.S. hospital-based physicians reported being overworked, while 1 in 5 said patient safety may be hurt by schedule issues, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers found 20% of responding doctors said catering to too many patients may increase the risk of medical errors, unnecessary lab tests or delayed diagnoses, and 36% said such problems happen more than once a week. U.S. News & World Report/HealthDay News (1/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Trends and Technology 
  SmartQuote 
I attribute my success to this: I never gave or took any excuse."
--Florence Nightingale,
British social reformer, nurse and statistician


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