Most Clicked SmartBrief on Your Career Stories


1. A guide to using the Eisenhower matrix

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 22, 2015

Former President Dwight Eisenhower developed a matrix for grouping tasks into categories such as urgent and important, urgent but less important, nonurgent but important, and nonurgent and unimportant. Under this strategy, the items that deserve your immediate attention should represent a very short list. The Globe and Mail (Toronto) (tiered subscription model) (05/20)


2. How to assert yourself to get ahead

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 20, 2015

Stop being self-conscious about stating what you're capable of and how much you're worth, writes Jennifer Winter. Also, start overdelivering on promises. "The single biggest factor in accelerating my career was my ability to impress my clients, colleagues, managers, and executives," she writes. TheMuse.com (05/19)


3. Are you earning a competitive wage?

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 21, 2015

Websites such as Salary.com, JobStar and WageWeb can help you determine how your salary compares to the rest of the market, writes author and speaker Bernard Marr. Professional organizations can provide general salary ranges, and government salaries are public record, he writes. LinkedIn (05/19)


4. Research links marriage, career success

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 26, 2015

A conscientious spouse can boost your career by helping you develop healthy habits and encouraging work-life balance, according to research from Washington University in St. Louis. Men and women experienced positive career effects from having a conscientious spouse, the research found. The Huffington Post (05/25)


5. The power of a 5-item to-do list

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 21, 2015

Serial entrepreneur Max Levchin co-founded PayPal and a number of other startups and sits on the boards of several high-profile tech companies. He starts his day by making a five-item to-do list and getting some exercise on his bike. He positions himself in the cafeteria area of the office so employees can talk to him, and he encourages his employees to write short e-mails. Inc. magazine (05/2015)


6. 8 things leaders must learn to let go of

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 20, 2015

Being attached to perceptions and reputation weakens you and limits your leadership potential, writes Scott Mabry. Figure out what you're clinging to -- such as control, fear, ego or a particular outcome -- and learn to approach people and situations without preconceptions or filters, Mabry writes. "Accountability, vision, values, influence, etc., still apply. Only now, they can be expressed free of a personal agenda grounded in fear and scarcity," Mabry argues. Soul To Work blog (05/18)


7. The unwritten rules of LinkedIn

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 22, 2015

Accept invitations right away, use the "I don't know" marker sparingly and customize your invitations to LinkedIn to ensure you're following social norms, Neil Patel writes. Avoid making persistent requests, and don't give out too many endorsements. Forbes (05/21)


8. Watch for these early signs of a failed job interview

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 26, 2015

It's often a bad sign when a job interviewer doesn't ask you how soon you can start, Lisa Rangel writes. Other bad signs include being asked only easy questions and not being informed about the next steps of the hiring process. Brazen Careerist (05/25)


9. How to limit e-mails and be more productive

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 26, 2015

Many professionals spend more than a quarter of their time answering e-mails, but it doesn't have to be this way, writes Phil Simon. Rather than engaging in e-mail conversations, try implementing a practice in which any issue that can't be handled in three e-mails moves to a phone call or in-person meeting. Business Insider (05/21)


10. 3 telltale signs of unsung leadership

SmartBrief on Your Career | May 22, 2015

Not all leaders are publicly known; many are those valuable but unappreciated employees who successfully lead despite lacking formal authority, writes Scott Edinger. To identify and cultivate such hidden leaders, look for people who are acknowledged by their peers as having significant expertise, good judgment and emotional intelligence. SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Leadership (05/21)




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