Most Clicked AAP SmartBrief Stories


1. Pediatricians could benefit from more training to accurately diagnose autism

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 16, 2015

Some pediatricians may dismiss a parent's concerns about their child's symptoms of autism because most doctors and other health care practitioners lack the training to diagnose the condition, according to a study in The Journal of Pediatrics. Pediatricians are advised by the American Academy of Pediatrics to screen 18-month-old children during their checkup and again when they are between the ages of 24 months and 30 months. National Public Radio (04/15)


2. Improve early identification of children with autism spectrum disorders

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 16, 2015

The CDC Autism Case Training is an AAP-endorsed curriculum that provides real life scenarios to improve early identification of children with autism spectrum disorders. The training modules help with identification, diagnosis and management of patients with autism spectrum disorders. A free CME and MOC Part 2 version of the training is available.


3. Study compares injected, inhaled measles vaccines

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 16, 2015

Blood tests conducted on 2,000 infants aged 9 months to 12 months revealed substantially greater concentrations of antibodies against the measles virus among those injected with the vaccine than those who were given the inhaled version. The findings appear in the New England Journal of Medicine. HealthDay News (04/15)


4. Course empowers pediatricians to motivate overweight/obese children

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 15, 2015

The online course "Obesity Prevention in Pediatrics" trains pediatricians to motivate obese and overweight children to manage their weight. Through case studies, the course helps pediatricians assess obesity risk, uncover and address factors that contributed to the weight problem, motivate change, and overcome social, economic and environmental barriers encountered in making behavioral changes. Learn more.


5. Diabetes in early pregnancy linked to higher autism risk in children

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 15, 2015

Children whose mothers were diagnosed with diabetes by the 26th week of pregnancy had a 42% increased risk of being diagnosed with autism, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Diabetes after 26 weeks of pregnancy and type 2 diabetes before conception were not associated with increased autism risk. USA Today (04/14)


6. Study finds link between sleep patterns, toddler's behavior

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 14, 2015

A Norwegian study of 32,662 pairs of mothers and children found that toddlers often had emotional or behavioral problems at the same age if they got less than 13 hours of sleep each night. The findings, published in JAMA Pediatrics, also revealed that children are at a greater likelihood of having emotional or behavioral problems when they reach age 5 if they slept less than 10 hours or woke three or more times every night at 18 months. Reuters (04/13)


7. Study links autism, epigenetic changes to men's DNA

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 15, 2015

Researchers analyzed the sperm of 44 fathers of babies who showed signs of autism and found that epigenetic changes to the men's DNA may be involved in increasing the risk of passing the condition from parents to children. The findings were published in the International Journal of Epidemiology. Independent (London) (tiered subscription model), The (04/15)


8. Children with epilepsy could benefit from medical marijuana

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 15, 2015

A study looked at the effect of marijuana oil, which contains cannabidiol but no THC, on children with severe epilepsy and found a decline in the number of convulsive seizures among patients who took the treatment daily for 12 weeks. The findings will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology. USA Today (04/13) HealthDay News (04/13)


9. Study finds narcotic medication use during pregnancy

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 14, 2015

A study of more than 112,000 women enrolled in the Tennessee Medicaid program showed approximately 28% had gotten a prescription filled for at least one narcotic pain medication, researchers reported in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers said 42% of the women who had a narcotics prescription also smoked during their pregnancy, compared with 26% of women who did not have prescriptions for narcotic medications. HealthDay News (04/13)


10. Young military children have lower vaccination rates, study says

AAP SmartBrief | Apr 14, 2015

A study in Pediatrics found that 28% of 3,421 children younger than 3 whose parents were in the military were not updated on their recommended vaccinations, compared with 21% of nonmilitary children. Researchers also found that the child's age, mother's education and frequent relocation were linked to lower vaccination rates. Reuters (04/13)




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