Most Clicked AWHONN SmartBrief Stories


1. Calif. study points to 5 top causes of maternal mortality

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 24, 2015

Cardiovascular disease, preeclampsia and eclampsia, hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism and amniotic fluid embolism are the main reasons for maternal mortality in California, and up to 70% of cases may be preventable, researchers reported in Obstetrics & Gynecology. The study found variance within the main causes related to factors such as race, age, BMI and delivery method. Medscape (free registration) (03/12)


2. Tips to avoid routine labor interventions that may disrupt moms and babies at birth

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 27, 2015

JOGNN Editor Nancy K. Lowe has specific suggestions for health care providers to ensure routine interventions during labor and birth don't interfere with the hormonal processes that could deprive women and infants of beginning breast-feeding and mother-baby attachment post-birth. Lowe addresses the recently released report from Childbirth Connection, Hormonal Physiology of Childbearing: Evidence and Implications for Women, Babies, and Maternity Care. Read the JOGNN editorial. Blank (03/27)


3. Hospitals make headway on nurse residency programs

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 27, 2015

A 2010 Institute of Medicine report called for implementing nurse residency programs, and recent data show an increasing number of hospitals have complied. By 2013, nursing graduates in 41% of institutions were offered the option. Susan Hassmiller, senior adviser for nursing for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, says evidence shows that residency programs lead to greater nurse competency and retention. Nurse.com (03/19)


4. Hospital NICUs offer donated breast milk for preemies

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 24, 2015

Some hospital NICUs are offering to provide donated breast milk for premature infants, as an alternative to formula, when mothers are not able to produce milk. Dr. Martha Caprio of NYU Langone Medical Center said maternal milk can improve outcomes for low birth weight babies. Daily News (New York) (03/16)


5. Nurse earnings study finds persistent gender gap

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 27, 2015

A research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that the gender gap in nursing salaries has not decreased in 25 years. Researchers found an average difference of about $5,100 annually between male and female RNs' pay. "A salary gap by gender is especially important in nursing because this profession is the largest in health care and is predominantly female, affecting approximately 2.5 million women," the authors wrote. Associated Press, The (03/24) HealthDay News (03/24) New York Times (tiered subscription model), The (03/24)


6. Pregnant women with depression may benefit from yoga

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 24, 2015

A small study in Women's Health Issues found that yoga may help pregnant women dealing with depression. Researchers observed 34 pregnant women with depression who took yoga classes for 10 weeks, noting a decrease in depression levels and an increase in levels of mindfulness. Four of the patients had treatment for depression outside the study. HealthDay News (03/19)


7. Weight gain after gestational diabetes may predict future type 2 diabetes risk

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 24, 2015

Obese women who gained more than 11 pounds after having gestational diabetes were 43 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life than those who were not obese and had less weight gain after gestational diabetes, according to a study in the journal Diabetologia. For each point increase in BMI after developing gestational diabetes, the likelihood of type 2 diabetes rose by 16%. DailyRx.com (03/20)


8. Breast biopsies not always black and white

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 24, 2015

Although biopsies have long been considered the gold standard for identifying cancerous cells, they may not be as useful when it comes to the gray area between what is benign or atypical and what is malignant, according to new research in JAMA. Biopsy slides from 240 women were examined by a panel of three experts and then sent to 115 practicing pathologists in eight states. While the highest levels of concordance between the individual pathologists and the expert panel were seen in cases of invasive carcinoma (96%), there were lower levels for ductal carcinoma in situ (84%) and atypical hyperplasia (48%). Read the abstract. Blank (03/24)


9. Will there be enough nurses to meet demand?

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 27, 2015

Predicting how many nurses will be needed in the future and whether that need will be met can be difficult, says ANA senior policy fellow Peter McMenamin. The ranks of nursing graduates and Title VIII funding are increasing. Nancy Griffin, an associate dean at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, says nurses are badly needed right now, and there are many pathways for nurses to follow. U.S. News & World Report (03/20)


10. Managing stress early has long-term benefits for breast cancer patients

AWHONN SmartBrief | Mar 24, 2015

Stress-management techniques such as deep breathing and muscle relaxation were associated with reductions in symptoms of depression and improved quality of life in patients with breast cancer for up to 15 years, according to a study in the journal Cancer. The randomized study included 240 women with recently diagnosed breast cancer. One group of patients entered a 10-week program to learn relaxation techniques and coping skills. DailyRx.com (03/23)




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