Most Clicked AOPA In Advance SmartBrief Stories


1. VA opens competition for advanced prosthetics, assistive technologies

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 21, 2015

The Department of Veterans Affairs' Center for Innovation is using crowdsourcing techniques to engage the public in building advanced prostheses and other devices to aid veterans with disabilities. The Innovation Creation Series has posed five challenges, such as creating a device that controls grip strength and speed of a prosthetic hand, novel hand prostheses to help amputees with specific tasks and a device that can ease tremors. The challenges begin in May and June. Defense One (05/20)


2. Breaking news from AOPA

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 21, 2015

AOPA and Congress take HHS to task on OTS orthotics -- read the congressional sign-on letter. AOPA's PR campaign, Mobility Saves, mentioned on CNN! CMS announces National Supplier Clearinghouse contractor -- find out who inside. Better business performance starts here -- complete the 2015 Operating Performance Survey and the 2015 Compensation Survey now! Don't miss the latest in AOPA's Breaking News! Blank (05/21)


3. Myoelectric implants allow lower-limb amputees to control prostheses with their thoughts

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 21, 2015

Surgeons have implanted myoelectric sensors developed by Ossur into the residual limbs of two amputees, enabling them to control prosthetic feet with their thoughts. The technology is the first that translates "subconscious" thoughts into movement, according to Ossur, which said the next step is a larger clinical trial. The company expects to have myoeletric devices on the market within three to five years. MassDevice.com (Boston) (05/20) Wired.co.uk (U.K.) (05/20)


4. Breaking news from AOPA

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 19, 2015

AOPA's PR campaign, Mobility Saves, is mentioned on CNN! AOPA member is providing O&P care in Nepal. Learn how you can help. Better business performance starts here -- complete the 2015 Operating Performance Survey and the 2015 Compensation Survey now! AOPA Assembly Registration is open -- register today. Don't miss the latest in AOPA's Breaking News! Blank (05/19)


5. Colombian company creates designer prosthetic arms and hands

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 21, 2015

Cocreat3D, based in Colombia, is developing a line of custom-designed passive prosthetic arms and hands for those more interested in aesthetics than in highly functional computerized prostheses. The prosthetic limbs will come in a variety of colors, materials and designs and can be customized with 3D printing technology for each user. 3DPrint.com (05/20)


6. Indego exoskeleton uses mobile app

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 19, 2015

Indego demonstrated a 25-pound, battery-powered, lower-limb exoskeleton in Henderson, Nev., that uses a mobile application to track posture and personalize settings. The exoskeleton, which straps around the waist and employs leg braces, is controlled by a handheld device. Indego will soon submit the exoskeleton for FDA approval and hopes for commercial release by 2016. KVVU-TV (Las Vegas) (05/15)


7. Researchers develop robotic arms controlled by eye movements

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 19, 2015

Physicians and scientists at the University of Arizona, Johns Hopkins University and Baltimore-based Harmony Robotics are developing a robotic arm controlled by eye movements. Functioning much like point-of-view video games, the technique will begin by using a computer screen interface but may eventually employ computerized glasses. Unlike current robotic arms using brain implants, the device would fit over the arms of quadriplegics and stroke victims, eliminating the need for surgery. Stars and Stripes (05/17)


8. Paralyzed Olympic champ uses Ekso in rehabilitation

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 19, 2015

Amy Van Dyken-Rouen, a six-time Olympic swimming champion who became paralyzed from the waist down last year, is using the Ekso Bionics exoskeleton as part of her rehabilitation. The device is available in Arizona only at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, which uses it mainly for patients with neurological conditions. Van Dyken-Rouen uses her core to shift her weight and initiates a step using her existing muscle strength, with the exoskeleton assisting as needed, her spokeswoman said. Arizona Daily Star (Tucson) (05/16)


9. Electronic brace helps Ind. woman move paralyzed arm

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 19, 2015

Laurie McCoy, who is recovering from two strokes, was fitted with the MyoPro electronic brace by orthotist Brian Steinberg at the Center for Orthotic & Prosthetic Excellence in Munster, Ind. With the brace, which was created by device company Myomo, she was able to move her paralyzed arm for the first time in two years. The MyoPro detects the user's muscle signaling using electronic sensory technology and then assists in arm movement. The Times (Munster-Hammond-Merrillville-Valparaiso, Ind.) (05/19)


10. Prosthetic devices aid a variety of animals

AOPA In Advance SmartBrief | May 21, 2015

Animals from dogs to dolphins have been among the beneficiaries of advances in prosthetic-limb technology. One of the first was Fuji, a dolphin at an aquarium in Okinawa that lived for years with a prosthetic tail made of rubber. A Rottweiler at Colorado State University has received four prosthetic legs, and researchers from BTech Innovation constructed a titanium beak for a sea turtle in Turkey. Tech Times (05/20)




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