Prevalence of risk factors for stroke increases, study finds | Low and high lipid levels tied to risks among Native Americans | Study: Optimal LDL may not be enough to prevent CV events
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October 12, 2017
PCNA SmartBrief
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Heart Health News
Prevalence of risk factors for stroke increases, study finds
Researchers found an increase in the prevalence of risk factors for ischemic stroke from 2004 to 2014, including diabetes, which increased from 31% to 38% among hospitalized stroke patients and rose by 2% each year. The findings in Neurology, based on 922,451 patients, revealed that 48.7% of Hispanic patients had diabetes, compared with 30.5% of white patients.
Healio (free registration)/Cardiology Today (10/11),  HealthDay News (10/11) 
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Low and high lipid levels tied to risks among Native Americans
All-cause mortality rates were higher among Native Americans with low serum lipid levels, while cardiovascular mortality rates were higher with higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol, according to a study in the Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications. While low cholesterol and low triglycerides are generally believed to be associated with better health and lower mortality, researchers said that is not universally the case, and evidence suggests there are risks at low and high levels.
Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (10/10) 
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Study: Optimal LDL may not be enough to prevent CV events
Research presented at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress found patients who achieve optimal LDL levels but are still at high risk for cardiovascular disease may benefit from additional treatment aimed at lipoprotein(a) and other lipids and proteins. Earlier research has shown patients with low LDL levels continue to have CV events.
Healio (free registration)/Cardiology Today (10/5) 
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Other News
Emerging Trends
Study: Global childhood obesity prevalence rises tenfold in 4 decades
The number of obese children and teens ages 5 to 19 around the globe totaled 124 million in 2016, compared with 11 million in 1975, while 192 million were moderately or severely underweight last year, according to a study in The Lancet. Being overweight is associated with earlier cardiac and metabolic disease and cancer, and being underweight may increase the risk of infectious disease and, in girls, pregnancy problems, including preterm birth and maternal death.
The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (10/10),  CNN (10/11),  Reuters (10/10) 
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Patients who refuse cardiac rehab may benefit from tai chi
Coronary artery disease patients who will not participate in cardiac rehabilitation programs may benefit from regular tai chi sessions, according to a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Patients who did tai chi three times per week reported higher levels of physical activity, quality of life and weight loss compared with those who attended twice per week.
Healio (free registration)/Cardiology Today (10/11) 
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Nursing in the News
Population health program helps workers manage chronic disease
The population health program at Franklin Corp. in Houston, Miss., has helped workers reduce their blood glucose, blood pressure, cholesterol and weight. The program, which is led by a registered nurse, helps people manage chronic diseases and provides support when they are discharged from the hospital.
Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal (Tupelo, Miss.) (10/6) 
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PCNA Update
PCNA's upcoming fall programs
PCNA's Fall Learning Series is a great way to earn continuing education contact hours and network with professionals in your area. These complimentary programs take place annually in multiple cities across the United States. Topics vary and may include cardiometabolic risk, antiplatelet therapy and heart failure. Over the next month, watch for programs in:
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