Focus on who you want to be, not your job title | Study: Mentorship on the way up helps female CEOs | How Netflix has shaken up the TV industry
June 14, 2018
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Leading Edge
Focus on who you want to be, not your job title
If you evaluate yourself based on your title or profession, try thinking instead about what you do for others and what that means to you, writes Naphtali Hoff. "[W]hen a person chooses to identify first by who they are as people and what motivates them in the service of others, they can more easily and confidently move forward," he writes.
SmartBrief/Leadership (6/13) 
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Study: Mentorship on the way up helps female CEOs
Research suggests that women who become CEOs at large companies will be more successful when they rise internally with support from other executives, writes Leigh Buchanan. Male CEOs of such companies, however, could generally be successful without such mentorship and by coming from outside the company.
Inc. online (6/12) 
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Motivation You Can Measure
While companies are moving toward a centralized rewards and recognition strategy, many fall short when it comes to quantifying the results of their efforts. Read about an approach for measuring ROI that even a CFO will love. Get the White Paper Today
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Strategic Management
How Netflix has shaken up the TV industry
Netflix has been changing the way consumers watch TV and movies since launching its DVD-by-mail service in 1997, followed by streaming content in 2007. The company continues to shake up the landscape with its binge-releasing schedule and its efforts to skip over the pilot process to bring series directly to consumers.
Vulture (6/10) 
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AT&T-Time Warner ruling could start a wave of M&A
A federal court's ruling to allow AT&T to purchase Time Warner could encourage more consolidation in media, such as a merger of Viacom and CBS and takeovers of such companies as Lionsgate, Sony Pictures and MGM. "In the new world order, companies will define themselves as either buyers or sellers," Nicole LaPorte writes.
Fast Company online (6/12),  Variety (6/12) 
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Time and Attendance Buyer’s Guide
An effective, automated time and attendance solution streamlines routine tasks, reduces errors, and helps eliminate cost, productivity, and compliance problems that can result from using manual, semi-automated, or disparate systems. Download now
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Smarter Communication
Tell the truth when a crisis hits
The first steps to take in a crisis include gathering the facts and committing to telling the truth internally and then externally, writes David Grossman. "No matter how successful the leader, there is one common truth -- communication is a learned skill," he writes.
LeaderCommunicator Blog (6/11) 
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The Big Picture
Each Thursday, what's next for work and the economy
Is the gig workforce shrinking? It's hard to say
Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the number of people working in contingent jobs decreased from 2005 to 2017, although the bureau's methodology could be undercounting the gig-worker population, writes Amanda Lenhart. "Business owners and certain self-employed workers aren't counted as contingent or alternative workers, so gig workers who think of themselves as business owners -- as many Etsy sellers do, for example -- will be missed by these definitions," she writes.
Slate (6/12) 
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In Their Own Words
How women can speak up, as told by Equinox's CEO
Women can help their voices get heard in male-dominated workplaces by staying strong, maintaining eye contact and being concise, says Niki Leondakis, CEO of Equinox. "Don't lose who you are, but learn to speak the language," she says.
CNBC (6/13) 
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Daily Diversion
The science behind our smiles
The science behind our smiles
(Pixabay)
No one can agree on how many types of smiles there are, with researchers over the past 45 years suggesting three main styles all the way up to more than 50. Cosmetic surgeons use three key types with their patients, writes Neil Steinberg.
Mosaic (UK) (6/9) 
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Editor's Note
SmartBrief remembers Anthony Bourdain
ProChef SmartBrief from the Culinary Institute of America published a special report this week reflecting on the life, work and writings of the late Anthony Bourdain. Read the special report.
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You won't be happy, whatever you do, unless you're comfortable with your own conscience.
Lucille Ball,
entertainer and producer
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