Study favors HPV test over Pap smear for cervical cancer screening | Preventive mastectomy may do little for women with breast cancer | Study: Letrozole beats clomiphene in treating PCOS-related infertility
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July 22, 2014
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Women's Health UpdateSponsored By
Study favors HPV test over Pap smear for cervical cancer screening
A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that human papillomavirus screening was better than the standard Pap test in evaluating cervical cancer risk. The findings, based on data from more than 1 million women in California, showed those who had a negative HPV test were about 50% less likely to develop cervical cancer than those who had a negative Pap test. HealthDay News (7/18)
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Preventive mastectomy may do little for women with breast cancer
Prophylactic mastectomy may offer little survival benefit to women with breast cancer, according to a study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that analyzed 20 years' worth of data for more than 100,000 women. Younger women with stage I estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer whose healthy breast was removed had a less than 1% improvement in survival over 20 years compared with women who did not have preventive mastectomy. HealthDay News (7/16)
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CCHD Screening Saves Lives
Masimo SET® pulse oximeters and sensors meet the recommended criteria for newborn screening, were exclusively used in the two studies that were the basis for the CCHD Workgroup decision to recommend newborn screening, and were the first to receive FDA 510(k) clearance with labeling for CCHD screening. Learn more
 
Obstetrics FocusSponsored By
Hormonal contraceptives linked to gestational diabetes risk in Mo. study
Women who used hormonal contraceptive methods prior to pregnancy were more likely than nonusers to develop gestational diabetes, according to a study in the CDC's Preventing Chronic Disease journal. Other factors linked to greater risk of diabetes in the study were being older than 30 and being overweight or obese, according to the analysis of data involving 2,741 women in Missouri. DailyRx.com (7/18)
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Behavioral therapy may improve mental health of mothers of preemies
Research published in the journal Pediatrics showed that mothers who received trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy experienced reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety six months after giving birth prematurely. DailyRx.com (7/20)
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CCHD Screening Education Online—CNE for Nurses
For years, oximetry has been used for diagnostic purposes, but now it is utilized effectively as a newborn screening tool for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD). Earn Nursing Contact Hours by completing this fully online course with a focus on understanding CCHD screening requirements, the screening process and interpreting screening results. Learn more.
 
AWHONN Spotlight on ResearchSponsored By
Study links prenatal alcohol exposure to gross motor (GM) problems
Children diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), or who were exposed to moderate to heavy amounts of alcohol prenatally, have triple the risk of gross motor (GM) problems compared to those with low exposure, according to a comprehensive review of previous studies, published in Pediatrics. GM skills are those requiring the use of large muscle groups to coordinate movement, such as walking, running, throwing and maintaining balance. Among the 10 studies in the meta-analysis, which included children aged 3 days to 13 years, GM impairment was consistently found regardless of the assessment tool used and across diverse settings and populations. The findings are important, say the authors, because children need GM skills to perform basic daily activities such as running to catch a school bus or balancing to get dressed. They conclude that GM assessment should be a standard part of FASD diagnosis and management, to enable early intervention.
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New White Paper: 6 Amateur Texting Mistakes in Hospitals
Learn where your hospital may be going wrong when it comes to using standard texting apps. Mistakes include not being able to link to your organization's directory or on-call schedules, and failing to secure sensitive information. How do you compare? Read the white paper now.
 
Neonatal Health
Early cord clamping may raise infant admission, death risk
Among self-breathing newborns in a rural Tanzanian hospital, clamping the umbilical cord before or immediately after onset of spontaneous respiration was associated with higher odds of admission and death, Norwegian researchers found. The likelihood of death or hospital admission fell by 20% for each 10-second delay in cord clamping, according to the study in Pediatrics. PhysiciansBriefing.com/HealthDay News (7/18)
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More Texas infants dying in bed-sharing accidents
Bed-sharing claimed the lives of 164 babies in Texas in the last 10 months, and the number of deaths is expected to rise. The Department of Family and Protective Services is preparing to launch an advertising campaign that aims to increase parents' awareness of bed-sharing risks. KYTX-TV (Tyler, Texas) (7/17)
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AWHONN News
Share your breastfeeding tips
We believe it's important that every nurse encourages new mothers to breastfeed. Do you or your hospital have a special way to encourage breastfeeding? When you get pushback from a patient, how do you overcome it? What tips would you give other nurses on breastfeeding? We will share some of your responses during World Breastfeeding Month in August. Please email your responses to Ramon Montes at rmontes@awhonn.org.
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Recruit new members to AWHONN and win great prizes!
As an AWHONN member, you know how valuable your membership is to keeping up-to-date in your practice. Refer new members to AWHONN now and you will help expand your networking opportunities, strengthen your professional association and win great prizes at the same time. The more new members you recruit, the more you win! Visit our Recruitment & Rewards website today for more details.
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Who's Hiring?
Position TitleCompany NameLocation
ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT - WOMEN & INFANT SERVICESAdvantage RMIArlington, VA
Registered Nurse - Family Birth CenterKapiolani Medical Center for Women & ChildrenHonolulu, HI
Click here to view more job listings.
 
SmartQuote
It is perhaps an all-too-human frailty to suppose that a favorable wind will blow forever."
-- Richard Bode,
American writer
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Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

AWHONN is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP580.
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