Tiny ultrasound device tracks brain activity in infants | Ultrasound predicts inflammatory arthritis risk | Imaging centers adding automated ultrasound to breast care services
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October 12, 2017
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Clinical Advancements in Sonography
Tiny ultrasound device tracks brain activity in infants
A domino-size ultrasound scanner can detect abnormal brain activity and seizures through the anterior fontanelles in real time and could be used to monitor infants' brain function. Researchers reported in Science Translational Medicine that the probe distinguished active and quiet sleep, and, when combined with EEG, not only detected seizures in two at-risk infants but also identified where in the brain the seizures originated.
Science online (10/11) 
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Ultrasound predicts inflammatory arthritis risk
Ultrasonographic imaging of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and joint pain can predict their risk for inflammatory arthritis, allowing early initiation of drug therapy that can delay progression and minimize damage, according to a study published in Arthritis Research & Therapy.
Rheumatology Network (free registration) (10/3) 
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Imaging centers adding automated ultrasound to breast care services
Medical centers including Albany Medical Center and Saratoga Hospital in New York are adding automated breast ultrasound imaging to better detect cancer in dense breast tissue. Lesions appear dark against lighter healthy tissue on ultrasound images, and though hand-held ultrasound is effective, automated ultrasound may be faster.
Times Union (Albany, N.Y.) (tiered subscription model) (10/11) 
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Technology Update
Scientists capture images of brain's lymphatic system
Scientists with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke published images from humans and marmosets in eLife documenting the brain's lymphatic system, which had been thought not to exist until a central nervous system lymphatic system was discovered in mice in 2015. The lymph vessels are concealed inside the thick, leatherlike dura mater and run alongside much larger blood vessels, making them difficult to detect on an MRI.
The Atlantic online (10/7) 
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Practice News
Patients and physicians benefit from patient electronic surveys
Routine use of patient-reported symptoms and outcomes at Partners HealthCare in Boston improved patient care and enhanced physician satisfaction, according to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine. "The knowledge gained from these assessments often differed from physicians' long-held assumptions and helped them better ally with patients during the recovery process," according to the study authors.
Medscape (free registration) (10/5) 
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Patient Care in Medicine
Acid blockers might allow bacterial growth that damages liver
The use of proton pump inhibitors may allow the overgrowth of intestinal Enterococcus, causing liver inflammation and necrosis, researchers reported in Nature Communications. Enterococcus levels rose in healthy volunteers who took the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole for 14 days, researchers found.
The San Diego Union-Tribune (tiered subscription model) (10/11) 
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Shorter sleeves on physician coats may reduce virus spread
Researchers said traces of infectious viruses were less likely to be found on sleeves or wrists of physicians wearing white coats with sleeves above the elbow, compared with long-sleeve coats. The study was presented at the IDWeek conference.
HealthDay News (10/6) 
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Patients born with heart defects may be prone to later health problems
Most of the 1% of infants born with congenital heart disease will reach adulthood, but these children are more likely to develop lifelong disorders such as autism, cardiac arrhythmias and respiratory problems than those without CHD, researchers reported in the journal Nature Genetics. The authors report an association between some autism-linked genes and CHD, and they found respiratory ailments associated with cilia defects in some patients with congestive heart failure.
HealthDay News (10/9) 
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Traumatic experiences tied to heart disease risk among women
A study presented at the annual meeting of the North American Menopause Society found women who experienced at least three traumatic events, such as sexual harassment, natural disasters or the death of a child, were more likely to have poorer endothelial function compared with women who had fewer traumatic experiences. The findings were based on data for 272 postmenopausal and perimenopausal women.
Medical News Today (10/11) 
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Legislative & Regulatory Update
FDA advisory panel to discuss patient input into device trials
The FDA's newly formed Patient Engagement Advisory Committee will hold a two-day meeting starting today to discuss patient input into medical device clinical trials with a focus on improving recruitment, retention and results communication. The meeting is open to the public and involves roundtable conversations with companies, including Boston Scientific and Johnson & Johnson.
BioCentury (10/9),  MassDevice (Boston) (10/10) 
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ARDMS News
Visit booth #606 to win a free $5 Starbucks gift card at #SDMS17!
ARDMS will attend the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography (SDMS) Annual Conference in Dallas. Stop by booth #606 to learn more about our job site, UltrasoundJOBS!
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Enter to win our Ultrasound Awareness Month Photo Contest and win a $300 gift card!
October is Ultrasound Awareness Month! Celebrate with ARDMS and submit a photo of you and your colleagues and how you all celebrate the month. Submit your photo by Oct. 31!
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Learn more about ARDMS:
ARDMS | Certifications & Examinations | Apply for an Examination
Prepare for an Examination | Schedule an Examination | Registrant Resources
Post on UltrasoundJOBS and Get Responses
UltrasoundJOBS.com is exclusively devoted to the recruitment of top ultrasound professionals. Post jobs online quickly and easily with maximum exposure to ultrasound professionals. Attract top talent by searching over 100,000 qualified resumes. Register Now!
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