Study: Acetaminophen may reduce feelings of positive emotion | 3D image of "wasabi receptor" could lead to new pain drugs | Mindfulness meditation may benefit chronic pain patients
 
Advertisement

April 15, 2015
News for the pain professional
SIGN UP|FORWARD|ARCHIVE|ADVERTISE

Pain Research News
Study: Acetaminophen may reduce feelings of positive emotion
Acetaminophen may reduce the ability to feel positive emotion even as it acts on pain, researchers reported in the journal Psychological Science. Researchers said study participants did not appear to realize that the drug had affected their emotions. CNN (4/15), Science World Report (4/14)
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
3D image of "wasabi receptor" could lead to new pain drugs
Scientists have developed a 3D image of the TRPA1 receptor, which is behind the body's reaction to irritants such as wasabi, tear gas and air pollution. The research, described in the journal Nature, could lead to new drugs that target pain and itching. National Public Radio/Shots blog (4/8), MedicalDaily.com (4/8)
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
FEATURED ARTICLE: 10 Small-Business Predictions for 2015
Things are looking up for small businesses in 2015. We count down the 10 ways you can get ahead in the New Year. Read the article.
Advertisement

Treatment News
Mindfulness meditation may benefit chronic pain patients
A study in the journal Pain Medicine found a mindfulness meditation program for chronic pain patients was associated with increased vitality scores as well as reduced anxiety and depression. The data indicated the intervention was linked with only small and insignificant levels of pain improvement. PhysiciansBriefing.com/HealthDay News (4/9)
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
Study: Ketamine may be effective for short-term acute pain
Short-term acute pain may respond to ketamine as well as it does to morphine, but patients given the medication in a hospital emergency department were more likely to experience dizziness and disorientation, researchers reported in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Sergey Motov of Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., who worked on the study, said the ketamine side effects may be linked to the infusion rate. Medscape (free registration)/Reuters (4/13)
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
Other News
Policy & Trends
La. bill is intended to restrict opioid prescriptions
Prescriptions for nonformulary medications, including opioids, would have to be demonstrated as medically necessary under a Louisiana Senate workers' compensation bill. Business Insurance (tiered subscription model) (4/8)
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
Study finds narcotic medication use during pregnancy
A study of more than 112,000 women enrolled in the Tennessee Medicaid program showed approximately 28% had gotten a prescription filled for at least one narcotic pain medication, researchers reported in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers said 42% of the women who had a narcotics prescription also smoked during their pregnancy, compared with 26% of women who did not have prescriptions for narcotic medications. HealthDay News (4/13)
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
Advertisement
 
APS News
Annual Meeting: National Pain Strategy Session
The APS Annual Scientific Meeting will cover the newest discoveries in multidisciplinary pain research and clinical care. The meeting will also discuss the future of pain. Attend "The National Pain Strategy -- Where Do We Go From Here?" on Saturday, May 16. This session will include a discussion on the National Pain Strategy, incorporating themes from the National Pain Strategy draft released April 2. A panel of speakers, who are involved in the strategy's development, will offer insight into its current status and next steps. This is a session you do not want to miss! Join APS in Palm Springs, Calif., from May 13-16. Register now.
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
Let's work together
Pain affects everyone, so why not help? There is a need for increased funding and educational resources in the pain science profession. APS established the Pain Research Fund to address the need for additional funding. The Pain Research Fund will provide early career research grants and the creation or revision of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. With your support, we can make a difference. Let's alleviate pain, together. Learn more and give today.
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
SmartQuote
Have patience. All things are difficult before they become easy."
-- Saadi,
poet
Share: LinkedInTwitterFacebookGoogle+Email
Learn more about APS ->Membership | Annual Meeting | Education | Funding Opportunities | About Us
Subscriber Tools
Please contact one of our specialists for advertising opportunities, editorial inquiries, job placements, or any other questions.
 
Editor:  Tom Parks
Advertising:  Wynn Hansen
  P: 202.470.1149
 
 

Download the SmartBrief App  iTunes / Android
iTunes  Android
Mailing Address:
SmartBrief, Inc.®, 555 11th ST NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20004
© 1999-2015 SmartBrief, Inc.®
Privacy policy |  Legal Information