Task force recommends folic acid supplements | AAFP, ACP guidance covers hypertension in older adults | Study: Combined metformin, glyburide shows benefits in gestational diabetes
January 17, 2017
Family Medicine SmartBrief
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Task force recommends folic acid supplements
The US Preventive Services Task Force's final recommendation on the use of folic acid to prevent neural tube defects calls for all women planning a pregnancy and those who are capable of pregnancy to take a daily supplement. The "A" recommendation reaffirmed earlier USPSTF guidance and paralleled the AAFP final recommendation statement.
AAFP News (1/16) 
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Clinical News
AAFP, ACP guidance covers hypertension in older adults
A joint practice guideline from the AAFP and the American College of Physicians on systolic blood pressure for hypertensive adults ages 60 and older calls for treating patients with persistent readings at or above 150 mm Hg until levels reach less than 150 mm Hg. The full report was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, and a summary will be published in the Annals of Family Medicine.
Medscape (free registration) (1/17) 
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Study: Combined metformin, glyburide shows benefits in gestational diabetes
Only 11% of women with gestational diabetes needed insulin after receiving a combination of metformin and glyburide, compared with 32% of those who received either drug alone, according to a study published in Diabetes Care. The findings, based on 104 women with gestational diabetes, showed comparable results in mean daily blood glucose and other neonatal and obstetric outcomes, including neonatal hypoglycemia, electrolyte imbalance and macrosomia, between patients in the combination therapy and monotherapy groups.
Healio (free registration)/Endocrine Today (1/13) 
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Cirrhosis risk higher for hospital patients with alcohol problems
A study found hospitalized patients with alcohol problems had more than a 10-fold higher risk of developing alcoholic liver cirrhosis over 15 years, compared with the general population. "Together with other evidence, our study indicates a need for the presence of alcohol care teams in the hospital setting," said researcher Gro Askgaard, M.D., of Copenhagen University Hospital.
Healio (free registration) (1/16) 
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Study finds differences in how asthma affects blacks, whites
The rates of hospitalization and death associated with asthma are up to three times higher in black people than in white people, and the difference might be explained in part by differences in airway inflammation, researchers reported in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Black people were more likely to have eosinophilic airway inflammation and may not respond as well to corticosteroids, suggesting that asthma needs to be treated differently in black people, study co-author and physician Sharmilee Nyenhuis said.
HealthDay News (1/13) 
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Infants with colic may benefit from mild acupuncture
Swedish researchers looked at 147 babies with colic and found that those who received either of two types of minimal acupuncture for two weeks had 40% lower crying duration between their first and last visits, compared with a 20% reduction among those who received standard care. The findings in the journal Acupuncture in Medicine also showed that 38% of those who received acupuncture met the criteria for colic during the second week of treatment, compared with 65% in the control group.
Reuters (1/16),  CNN (1/16) 
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Practice Management
Video changed patients' screening intentions, study says
A study in the Annals of Family Medicine found a video intervention changed patient intentions regarding US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for prostate cancer and mammography screening. The video included illustrative slides and scenes in which patients and physicians talked about screenings.
Physician's Briefing/HealthDay News (1/16) 
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Health Policy & Legislation
MedPAC considers overhaul of MIPS quality reporting
Quality reporting requirements under the Medicare Access and Chip Reauthorization Act's Merit Based Incentive Program may be too burdensome to be of value, according to the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission's technical staff, who asked MedPAC experts whether and how to adjust the program. Suggestions included reducing or eliminating clinician reporting and eliminating the "exceptional performance" fund.
MedPage Today (free registration) (1/13) 
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Coalition recommends ways to make health care better
How to make health care better, according to the Healthcare Leadership Council.
(Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Incoming leadership can improve value and experience in the US health care system by investing in validated, cost-efficient wellness practices; expanding telehealth use across care and payment models; and ensuring a fully interoperable system by the end of 2018, according to policy recommendations from the Healthcare Leadership Council. Other priorities include expanding interstate licensure of health care professionals, fostering collaboration to fight fraud and abuse, and allowing health insurers increased flexibility in designing affordable plans.
HealthLeaders Media (1/16) 
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Professional Issues & Trends
Study sounds alarm on superbugs in US hospitals
Study sounds alarm on superbugs in US hospitals.
(Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images)
A study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found a variety of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae species in three Boston hospitals and one California hospital, findings that suggest the potentially deadly superbug is more prevalent in US hospitals than previously believed. CRE species cause 9,300 infections in the US each year and 600 deaths, with incidence rising, and researchers say greater surveillance is needed.
HealthDay News (1/16) 
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Inside the AAFP
Is direct primary care right for you? Find out.
AAFP DPC workshop
Attend the Direct Primary Care Workshop in Atlanta on March 11 to get the answers you need. Hear from industry experts, and gain first-hand knowledge of the benefits and challenges involved with a DPC practice. Space is limited. Save $200 when you register by Feb. 10.
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AAFP CareerLink - Connecting Family Physicians and Employers
Asst/Assoc Professor Family Medicine
UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA RENO, SCHOOL OF MEDICINE - 
Primary Care Physician
SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT HEALTH CENTER - Rohnert Park, California
Family Physician - FREE Healthcare benefit to you and your family
ARROWHEAD HEALTH CENTERS - Glendale, Arizona
Family Physician
HOPE CHRISTIAN HEALTH CENTER - 
Family Medicine Physician in Rockford, IL
MERCYHEALTH - Rockford, Illinois
Family Medicine Physician in Janesville, WI
MERCYHEALTH - Janesville, Wisconsin
Family Medicine Residency Faculty in Janesville, WI
MERCYHEALTH - Janesville, Wisconsin
Family Medicine Residency Faculty in Rockford, IL
MERCYHEALTH - Rockford, Illinois
BC/BE Family Medicine Physician in Lake Geneva, WI
MERCYHEALTH - Lake Geneva, Wisconsin
Family Physician for Outpatient Clinic in Los Angeles & SD, CA
ELDORADO COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTER - 
Physician, Emergency Medicine
NORTH MEMORIAL HEALTH CARE - Faribault, Minnesota
BE/BC Family Practitioner
CALIFORNIA SPINE CENTER - 
Physician
MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM - Abilene, Kansas
Chief Medical Officer
SUMMIT COMMUNITY CARE CLINIC - Frisco, Colorado
PHYSICIAN Family Medicine
WINTHROP-UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL - Mineola, New York
  
  
The history of progress is written in the blood of men and women who have dared to espouse an unpopular cause, as, for instance, the black man's right to his body, or woman's right to her soul.
Emma Goldman,
activist and writer
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About AAFP
This news roundup is provided as a timely update to AAFP members and other health care professionals about family medicine topics in the news media. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of family physicians who may find them of use in discussions with patients or colleagues. Opinions expressed in Family Medicine SmartBrief are those of the identified authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of the American Academy of Family Physicians. On occasion, media articles may include or imply incorrect information about the AAFP and its policies, positions or relationships. For clarification on AAFP positions and policies, we refer you to http://aafp.org.
External Resources are not a part of the AAFP website. AAFP is not responsible for the content of sites that are external to the AAFP. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by AAFP of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site.

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