Why ego can be an asset for leaders | How to avoid the biggest threat to your career | Be choosy about attending conferences
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January 13, 2017
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Getting Ahead
Why ego can be an asset for leaders
Confidence
(Pixabay)
Having a healthy ego can be important for leaders, who need to be aware of how their actions affect the company and how they can be agents of change, writes S. Chris Edmonds. Confidence is required in leaders as a way to foster organizational pride, Edmonds writes.
Fast Company online (1/12) 
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How to avoid the biggest threat to your career
In many ways, the biggest threat to your career is the danger of being pigeonholed, restricting your growth. You must be prepared to prove to others that you can expand beyond your current role to reach your goals, writes Steve Tobak.
Entrepreneur online (1/11) 
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Making the Connection
Be choosy about attending conferences
Think carefully about which conferences and networking events you'll attend, factoring in the time away from work, travel demands and other factors, writes Dorie Clark. Research who will be attending, and see if there's anyone you'd like to meet as you determine whether an event is worth your time.
Harvard Business Review online (tiered subscription model) (1/10) 
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How to tap into everyday networking opportunities
Something as simple as a better email signature line that includes links to your social media accounts can help you network, writes J. Kelly Hoey. You can also optimize your LinkedIn profile or your personal bio at speaking engagements to encourage others to approach you.
Fast Company online (1/10) 
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The Landscape
House Dems push back against proposed federal hiring freeze
House Democrats sent a letter to President-elect Donald Trump urging him to abandon his plan to implement a hiring freeze for federal agencies. The letter points out that past hiring freezes have not successfully controlled federal employment and that a freeze would prevent agencies from recruiting top talent, leaving skills gaps.
FederalNewsRadio.com (1/11) 
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Your Next Challenge
Correcting common job-search assumptions
You can still get hired without knowing someone at a company, and while you should tailor your resume for each new opportunity, the changes shouldn't have to be that large, Marcelle Yeager writes. Yeager also says it's worth the time to write a cover letter, just in case it makes a difference to the hiring manager.
U.S. News & World Report (1/12) 
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Balancing Yourself
Spend less time on apps and focus more on work
You should spend less time on social media apps and focus more of your efforts on sustained periods of work, writes Morra Aarons-Mele. The ability to focus without being distracted regularly will set apart some job candidates from others, said computer scientist, professor and author Cal Newport.
Forbes (1/12) 
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The Water Cooler
Video games are not as random as you'd think
Video game developers have the challenge of deliberately engineering a degree of luck -- to keep players from getting frustrated or discouraged -- without them realizing the interference, writes Simon Parkin. "Call it the Lucky Paradox: Lucky is fun, but too lucky is unreal," he writes.
Nautilus (1/12) 
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Sometimes we have the dream but we are not ourselves ready for the dream. We have to grow to meet it.
Louis L'Amour,
writer
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