Applebee's apologizes, fires employees for racial profiling | Why IBM is suing its former diversity chief | Report: Gender wage gap persists at US nonprofits
February 15, 2018
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Applebee's apologizes, fires employees for racial profiling
Applebee's fired three employees and temporarily closed its Independence Center mall location in Missouri after a video went viral of the employees falsely accusing two black women of departing the restaurant without paying their bill. The company issued a public apology and said it will ensure the rest of the employees at that location reflect on and learn from the situation.
The Macon Telegraph (Ga.) (2/13) 
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Why IBM is suing its former diversity chief
Why IBM is suing its former diversity chief
(Mark Renders/Getty Images)
IBM is suing former Chief Diversity Officer Lindsay-Rae McIntyre for allegedly violating a noncompete agreement by taking the same job at Microsoft. IBM argues McIntyre is taking "trade secrets" to Microsoft, saying she has vast knowledge of IBM's diversity and inclusion practices.
Quartz (2/14) 
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Report: Gender wage gap persists at US nonprofits
Women hold 66% of top executive positions and 75% of grant-making roles at nonprofits, but on average earn 84% of what male counterparts make doing similar work, according to a survey of 330 nonprofits by Exponent Philanthropy.
The NonProfit Times (Morris Plains, N.J.) (2/14) 
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Innovation in the Workforce
Leaders must get involved to eliminate unconscious bias at work
In order to overcome unconscious bias, organizations must provide sufficient training for employees to address the issue, write Sarah Grausz and Farah Mahesri. Leaders should also make diversity and inclusion part of their company performance goals and actively work to make the workplace a more inclusive place, they add.
Devex (free registration) (2/13) 
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Building a culture of true inclusion
Companies often take a superficial approach to diversity initiatives, adding members of underrepresented groups as a response to criticism, writes Basecamp's Janice Burch. Build a culture of true inclusion by making everyone feel safe in expressing their opinions and actually listening to what they have to say, Burch writes.
Signal v. Noise (2/12) 
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Lean In campaign asks men to mentor women
Lean In campaign asks men to mentor women
(Pixabay)
Lean In has introduced the #MentorHer campaign to encourage men to mentor women, after a survey by the organization has found nearly 50% of male managers fear workplace interaction with women in wake of the #MeToo movement. The survey also says 16% of male managers hesitate to mentor women, while nearly 30% fear being alone with a woman for work.
CNBC (2/6) 
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Leadership and Management
Audiences will listen if they can relate
Improving your likability with an audience improves the likelihood your message will be heard, so learn beforehand who is sitting out there and what they want to get out of your talk, writes Jim Anderson. The audience will also feel more connected if you use inclusive pronouns such as "we" and "our."
The Accidental Communicator (2/13) 
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Are you being authentic?
Social media can present a false image of who people are, and leaders must be especially aware that being authentic is the way to build trust and support, writes Naphtali Hoff. "Ask yourself, 'How would I behave if money and social expectations were not factors in my life?' " he writes.
SmartBrief/Leadership (2/14) 
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Top HR leaders are often women
Women comprise 60% of chief HR officers at the top 100 US companies by revenue and the majority of HR executives named in 2017, according to Russell Reynolds Associates data. Only seven of those 100 largest companies have a woman as CEO.
Bloomberg (free registration) (2/7) 
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SmartBrief Originals
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Learn to conquer your fears. That's the only art we have to learn to master these days.
Friedrich Durrenmatt,
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