These are some of the best books on business | An unrecognized employee is the worst kind | Coca-Cola CEO defines what makes a good market opportunity
November 21, 2017
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Leading Edge
These are some of the best books on business
A list of top business books as compiled by Fortune's Polina Marinova includes "Titan," the story of John D. Rockefeller; "Shoe Dog" by Nike founder Phil Knight; and "The Smartest Guys in the Room," about Enron. The list also includes selections on business fundamentals, management and entrepreneurship.
Fortune (11/17) 
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An unrecognized employee is the worst kind
The worst thing a leader or organization can do is fail to recognize the hard work of employees, says former Yum CEO David Novak. "[L]ook for employees who are accomplishing their goals, daily, monthly or even longer, and reward them with something that shows your gratitude for their accomplishment," David Sturt and Todd Nordstrom write.
Forbes (11/15) 
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Strategic Management
Coca-Cola CEO defines what makes a good market opportunity
Coca-Cola CEO defines what makes a good market opportunity
Quincey (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Coca-Cola is experimenting with ways to get shoppers to buy its products online, and it continues to make acquisitions while denying plans to invest in alcoholic beverages. "Whether it's a bolt-on or it's anything transformational, it's always got to obey three criteria: there's a strategic fit, there's a logic strategically, and the numbers financially add up, and there's opportunity," said CEO James Quincey.
Bloomberg (free registration) (11/17),  CNBC (11/16) 
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Smarter Communication
Presenting to upper management? Here's what you need
Presentations to upper management need to stick to a single, clear message, writes Joel Garfinkle. "The information you're presenting needs to be just as clear and on message as the words you plan to say -- and when in doubt, leave it out," he writes.
SmartBrief/Leadership (11/20) 
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Ask a question, then stop talking
Smart questions are diluted when you keep talking, Dan Rockwell writes. Ignore your discomfort, and give the other person a chance to answer.
Leadership Freak (11/16) 
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Innovation & Creativity
A weekly spotlight on making the next big thing happen
Creativity is becoming a requirement
As the workplace evolves, the ability to be creative is moving up the list of desirable employee traits, writes Eric McNulty. "Leaders should work for clarity about what creativity means for a specific role, and to do this, it's helpful to think about what creativity means in various contexts," he writes.
Strategy+Business online (free registration) (11/14) 
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In Their Own Words
HR Solutions exec: You don't need to be the smartest person in the room
Being able to look at the big picture and understand how the pieces work has helped Leslie Austin, HR Solutions' chief operations officer, move from HR to the C-suite. "[I]f you aren't the smartest person in the room, the willingness to accept new challenges and work very, very hard will pay off and carry you far," Austin says.
Greater Baton Rouge Business Report (La.) (11/20) 
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Daily Diversion
How puddings stopped being an American favorite
In the 19th century, the term "pudding" could describe a variety of dishes, including main courses of varying quality. In the US, puddings long ago fell out of favor, mostly seen today as sweet desserts, though the pudding remains a staple of British cooking.
The Conversation (US) (11/19) 
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It's lack that gives us inspiration.
Ray Bradbury,
writer
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