Virtual veterinary medicine firm finds bricks-and-mortar home | Zoetis acquiring Nexvet and its investigational pain drugs for pets | Veterinarians volunteer to keep homeless people's pets healthy
April 17, 2017
APPA SmartBrief
News for the Pet Industry
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Industry Watch
Virtual veterinary medicine firm finds bricks-and-mortar home
Skyline Vet Pharma is establishing a headquarters at the AgTech Accelerator in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park after operating as a virtual company since CEO and veterinarian Serge Martinod co-founded the company in 2015. Skyline reformulates drugs already approved for human use so that they are easier to administer to pets for pain and inflammation, cardiovascular disease and microbial infections.
The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) (4/13) 
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Zoetis acquiring Nexvet and its investigational pain drugs for pets
Zoetis is acquiring Nexvet, an Ireland-based drugmaker that has a monoclonal antibody in the pipeline to treat osteoarthritis pain in dogs via monthly injections. Another monoclonal antibody treatment is being developed by Nexvet to treat cats.
Xconomy (4/13) 
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Veterinarians volunteer to keep homeless people's pets healthy
Veterinarian Jennifer Fitzpatrick was among the volunteers providing free vaccinations for pets belonging to residents of a Yakima, Wash., homeless encampment. The dogs and cats also received microchips, collars, tags, leashes, food and bowls.
Yakima Herald-Republic (Wash.) (free registration) (4/16) 
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Bunnies are cute, but they are not easy-care pets
Bunnies are cute, but they are not easy-care pets.
(Jacques Demarthon/AFP/Getty Images)
Rabbits are the third-most-popular pet in the US and also the third-most abandoned, in part because many people do not realize that they can live 10 to 12 years and have other needs that set them apart from goldfish and hamsters, says Anne Martin, executive director of the House Rabbit Society. Rabbits' medical care can be more expensive than for other pets; they need ample exercise; they can be aggressive; and, as prey animals, they do not typically like to be held.
National Geographic online (4/12) 
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Top Trends and Product News
Pets, kids stay in sight thanks to VR tracker jacket
A wearable device enables virtual reality gamers to keep tabs on pets and even involve them in the game. The tracker jacket was created by VR game studio Triangular Pixels.
TheNextWeb.com (4/12) 
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Slideshow: High-tech gizmos reach out and touch pets from workplace
New digital devices allow people to monitor and even feed and play with their pets while at work. For example, Petcube Bites allows remote dispensing of treats, and Petcube Play boasts a laser to stimulate play.
ZDNet (4/10) 
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At Wis. cafe, patrons are welcome to take home a cat
A nonprofit coffee shop in De Pere, Wis., doubles as an adoption center for cats, most of them with special needs. "We rehabilitate them to the best of our ability and we try to find them homes so that they can get a second chance," Safe Haven Pet Sanctuary co-founder Elizabeth Feldhausen said.
WGBA-TV (Green Bay, Wis.) (4/14) 
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Texas A&M center cares for pets after owners can't
Pets whose owners pass away or otherwise become unable to care for them have a friend in the Stevenson Companion Animal Life-Care Center at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. The sanctuary is funded mostly by a foundation and a bequest.
Marco Eagle (Marco Island, Fla.) (4/13) 
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Regulatory & Government Issues
Md. law will allow first responders to resuscitate pets
A bill expected to be signed by Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan will explicitly allow first responders to provide emergency medical care to animals, including the emergency overdose drug naloxone, without fear of prosecution. The new law would exempt first responders in emergency situations from a state law that forbids giving medical care to animals without a veterinary license.
The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (4/13) 
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Concern for animals crosses party lines
More than a dozen bipartisan animal welfare bills have been introduced in the House and Senate this year, including proposals that would restrict ownership and breeding of lions and other big cats; provide grants to shelters that allow domestic violence victims to bring pets with them; ban soring of horses; prohibit the exchange and slaughter of dogs and cats for human consumption; and expand federal authority to prosecute animal cruelty.
USA Today (4/14) 
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