Congenital heart defects tied to maternal CVD risk | Researchers tie autoimmune hepatitis in pregnancy to adverse birth outcomes | CDC supports treatment option for pregnant women with uncomplicated malaria
April 17, 2018
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Maternal Health
Congenital heart defects tied to maternal CVD risk
A Canadian study in Circulation found mothers who gave birth to infants with a heart defect had a greater risk of developing atherosclerotic disorders, including myocardial infarction and heart failure, and having cardiovascular hospitalizations. The findings were based on more than 1 million mothers who were followed for up to 25 years.
Medscape (free registration) (4/12) 
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Researchers tie autoimmune hepatitis in pregnancy to adverse birth outcomes
A study presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's annual meeting found autoimmune hepatitis during pregnancy was associated with higher risks of adverse birth outcomes, including preterm birth and having an infant who was small for gestational age. The findings, based on data for 1,947 Danish women with autoimmune hepatitis and 19,470 matched controls, did not show any clear association between adverse birth outcomes and immunosuppression.
MedPage Today (free registration) (4/13) 
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CDC supports treatment option for pregnant women with uncomplicated malaria
Health care providers should consider Novartis' artemisinin-based therapy Coartem as a treatment option for women with uncomplicated malaria in their second and third trimesters of pregnancy at doses similar to those recommended for nonpregnant women, according to updated CDC recommendations in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Coartem may be considered during the first trimester when other treatment options are unavailable.
Healio (free registration)/Infectious Disease News (4/13) 
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Chronic hypertension tied to poor pregnancy outcomes
A history of chronic hypertension is associated with a greater risk of poor pregnancy outcomes even when blood pressure is normal before 20 weeks, according to a study of 830 women with a history of chronic hypertension and 476 women without in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology. Women taking antihypertensive medication had the highest risk in the study.
Medscape (free registration) (4/12) 
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Women's Health & Primary Care
Menopausal symptom severity linked with vascular dysfunction
A study in Menopause found endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness were linked with greater intensity of menopausal symptoms across stages of menopause. The findings were based on 138 healthy women ages 19 to 70.
MedPage Today (free registration) (4/11) 
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Eggs, romaine lettuce focus of salmonella, E. coli outbreaks
A company that owns a North Carolina farm has recalled more than 200 million eggs that the FDA says are likely connected to 22 cases of salmonella. The CDC is looking at whether romaine lettuce is linked to an E. coli outbreak that has sickened people in 11 states.
KING-TV (Seattle) (4/16),  LiveScience (4/16) 
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Study links cigarette smoking to elevated HF risk among blacks
Cigarette smoking among black men and women is tied to higher mean left ventricular mass, lower mean LV systolic function and higher levels of brain natriuretic peptide, which indicates heart failure, compared with never smoking, according to a study in Circulation. The findings, based on data for 4,129 Jackson Heart Study participants, showed the risk of being hospitalized for heart failure was around 3.5-fold among those who smoked 20 cigarettes or more each day and twofold among those who smoked at least a pack of cigarettes for at least 15 years.
Family Practice News (4/16),  Reuters (4/16) 
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Infant Health
Brief air pollution exposure may up risk of lower respiratory infections
Researchers linked every short-term increase of 10 micrograms per cubic meter in fine air particulate matter PM2.5 to a 15% to 23% higher likelihood of acute lower respiratory infections in children and adults. The findings in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine were based on data involving 146,397 individuals with respiratory infections, 77% of whom were youths younger than 2.
The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (4/13) 
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Professional News
Racial disparities continue in US infant, maternal care
Racial disparities infant mortality have been a problem for more than a century in the US and the US is one of only 13 countries in the world where maternal mortality rates are higher than 25 years ago. Midwife Rachel Zaslow created Sisters Keeper in Charlottesville, Va., which provides free doula birthing services to women of color and has not had a maternal death in more than 300 attended births since 2015.
The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (4/11) 
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ACNM News
Students -- Sign up for an introductory webinar on the ACNM Annual Meeting in Savannah
Students -- if you're going or thinking about going to this year's Annual Meeting in Savannah, join us for a free webinar with all the info you need to make sure you have a great time! The webinar will highlight the major events, cover ways to get the most out of your experience, and more! It will be held Wednesday, April 25, at 8 p.m. EST, using GoToMeeting. Questions? E-mail Student Rep. Lillian Medhus, lillianmedhus@gmail.com. Read more.
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Treasures needed for DGH's Silent Auction at 2018 Annual Meeting
Donate a global treasure from your international travels or any high-quality treasure to the Division of Global Health's Reception and Silent Auction. Proceeds benefit the Bonnie Westenberg Pedersen International Midwife Award, which supports an international midwife's attendance at the Annual Meeting. Don't forget to buy your ticket now and join us Monday, May 21, 8-10 p.m. Read more.
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Spread the Word: FACNM 2018 Speed Mentoring Coffee
The 2018 Speed Mentoring Coffee will be held on Wednesday, May 23, from 7 to 8:30 at the Annual Meeting in Savannah, Ga. We are recruiting members wanting mentoring and career development advice. This offering is intended for experienced midwives, not students or new graduates. If you're interested, e-mail Cecilia Jevitt at cecilia.jevitt@yale.edu. The deadline to apply is May 19. Don't miss this opportunity to scramble with the Fellows!
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CPM Symposium is May 11-13 -- discount pricing extended
The National Association of Certified Professional Midwives and its partners invite you to attend the 2018 CPM Symposium, May 11-13 in Potomac, Md. The symposium brings together midwives, childbearing people, students, educators, policymakers and others to plan for the future of the CPM profession. Please join us! Read more.
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The hunger for love is much more difficult to remove than the hunger for bread.
Mother Teresa,
nun and missionary
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